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Bioengineering Overview - Preparation - Day In The Life - Specialty Areas - Earnings - Employment - Career Path Forecast - Major Advances -
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Preparation
A bachelor's degree in engineering is required for almost all entry-level engineering jobs. Unlike many other engineering specialties, a graduate degree may be recommended or required for some entry-level jobs in bioengineering.

College graduates with a degree in a physical science or mathematics occasionally may qualify for some engineering jobs, especially in specialties in high demand. Most engineering degrees are granted in electrical, electronics, mechanical, chemical, civil, or materials engineering.  However, engineers trained in one branch may work in related branches. For example, some biological engineers also have training in mechanical engineering. This flexibility allows employers to meet staffing needs in new technologies and specialties in which engineers may be in short supply. It also allows engineers to shift to fields with better employment prospects or to those that more closely match their interests.

At the college level, the student usually selects engineering as a field of study, then chooses a discipline concentration within engineering. Some students will major in bioengineering or biomedical engineering, while others may major in a traditional field such as electrical, mechanical, or chemical engineering, with a specialty in biomedical engineering.

Most engineering programs involve a concentration of study in an engineering specialty, along with courses in both mathematics and science. Most programs include a design course, sometimes accompanied by a computer or laboratory class or both.

Source: Engineering Workforce Commission of the American Association of Engineering Societies.

Admission Requirements
Admissions requirements for undergraduate engineering schools include a solid background in mathematics (algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus) and science (biology, chemistry, and physics), and courses in English, social studies, humanities, and computer and information technology. Bachelor's degree programs in engineering typically are designed to last 4 years, but many students find that it takes between 4 and 5 years to complete their studies. In a typical 4-year college curriculum, the first 2 years are spent studying mathematics, basic sciences, introductory engineering, humanities, and social sciences. In the last 2 years, most courses are in engineering, usually with a concentration in one branch.

Co-ops
Internships and Coops provide students with a great opportunity to gain real-world experience while still in school. Click here for more information.

High School Prep
The high school preparation for bioengineering is the same as for any other engineering discipline, except that some life science course work should also be included.

Alternate Degree Paths
Some engineering schools and 2-year colleges have agreements whereby the 2-year college provides the initial engineering education, and the engineering school automatically admits students for their last 2 years. In addition, a few engineering schools have arrangements whereby a student spends 3 years in a liberal arts college studying pre-engineering subjects and 2 years in an engineering school studying core subjects, and then receives a bachelor's degree from each school. Some colleges and universities offer 5-year master's degree programs. Some 5-year or even 6-year cooperative plans combine classroom study and practical work, permitting students to gain valuable experience and to finance part of their education.

Graduate Training
Graduate training is essential for engineering faculty positions and many research and development programs, but is not required for the majority of entry-level engineering jobs. Many engineers obtain graduate degrees in engineering or business administration to learn new technology and broaden their education. Many high-level executives in government and industry began their careers as engineers.  It is important to select a degree program that has been accredited.
  

Source: Engineering Workforce Commission of the American Association of Engineering Societies.

Accredited Programs
Those interested in a career in Bioengineering/Biomedical should consider reviewing engineering programs that are accredited by ABET, Inc. If you choose to attend a program that is not ABET accredited, you should be sure that the university is regionally accredited. The following is a current list of all universities offering accredited degree programs in Bioengineering. Be sure to check with ABET for additions or changes.

Note: Some resources in this section are provided by the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Whitaker Foundation.
 


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