Degree Fields
Industry Options
Precollege Ideas
Academic DegreesCareer Planning
University Choice
Diversity & WomenSCCC PodcastsSCCC Newsletter
Meet Professionals
Downloads & Links
Site Search / A -Z

Bookmark and Share


Physics Overview - Overview PowerPoint - Podcast

Kimberly Titus

Research Assistant
Professor
College of Textiles
North Carolina State
University


 
B.S. -- Physics & Mathematics (double major); Stetson University
PhD -- Physics (Experimental Solid State); North Carolina State University
Research Assistant Professor, developing sensors for apparel automation as well as teaching classes at the university.
"Being a woman in physics has not always been easy, because it is primarily a male field. Sometimes you have to push your way on in, and learn things the hard way. And it's been challenging, but I think the doors are opening wider and wider for women."


Titus:
"The area that I'm working in and that is developing sensors for apparel automation, is actually an area in which relatively little research has been done. That's one of the things that excites me about what I'm doing, is that there's so much opportunity. We brainstorm and come up with all these ideas. And we hardly know where to start sometimes. I'm trying to look at those seam folds and stitch folds throughout the industry. And of course, there's a large volume of knit fabric as well as denim fabric. They're probably the largest areas of apparel manufacturing. Often as the industry's moving toward apparel manufacturing being more automated, you're removing the operator, therefore, you're moving you quality control. And if you do that, for the United States to remain competitive at all, you've got to have some way of determining the quality of seam."

Titus:
"Most of my teaching is done primarily three days a week and a lot of my preparation is outside of my work time here. So really I have close to 40 hours a week devoted to research and specifically it's in the area of aperonimation (PH) -- doing a lot of the fundamental work needed to develop sensors or sensing techniques to monitor seam and stitch quality. I interact with faculty members which are not a very homogeneous group actually, as you have in a lot of fields. Faculty members are from a variety of engineering backgrounds: mechanical, electrical, industrial, and computer engineering. There are number of chemists and some other physicists as well or faculty members who have even undergraduate/graduate degrees in physics. I also work with a number of students also from a very diverse background. And there are also a number of industrial people which pass through that I get to speak with and rub elbows with."

Titus: "Being a woman in physics has not always been easy, because it is primarily a male field. Sometimes you have to push your way on in, and learn things the hard way. And it's been challenging, but I think the doors are opening wider and wider for women."

Download Full Profile as PDF
 


Science
 Atmospheric Science
 Biology
 Chemistry
 Geosciences
 Physics
 Science TechniciansTechnology
Engineering
Mathematics
Computing
Healthcare


Students
Counselors
Teachers
Parents
Graduates

      AboutContactsCopyrightMedia SupportSubscriptions