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Nuclear Engineering Overview - Preparation - Day In The Life - Earnings - Employment - Career Path Forecast - Professional Organizations 


Day in the Life
Beginning engineering graduates usually work under the supervision of experienced engineers and, in large companies, also may receive formal classroom or seminar-type training. As new engineers gain knowledge and experience, they are assigned more difficult projects with greater independence to develop designs, solve problems, and make decisions. Engineers may advance to become technical specialists or to supervise a staff or team of engineers and technicians. Some may eventually become engineering managers or enter other managerial or sales jobs.

Teams and Coworkers
Almost all jobs in engineering require some sort of interaction with coworkers. Whether they are working in a team situation, or just asking for advice, most engineers have to have the ability to communicate and work with other people. Engineers should be creative, inquisitive, analytical, and detail-oriented. They should be able to work as part of a team and to communicate well, both orally and in writing. Communication abilities are important because engineers often interact with specialists in a wide range of fields outside engineering. Writing and presentation skills are also vital so engineers can share their research and experiences with colleagues through topical meetings, professional associations, and various publications.

Tasks
Nuclear engineers research, design and develop the processes, instruments, and systems used to derive benefits from nuclear energy and radiation. They develop, monitor, and operate nuclear plants used to generate power. They may work on the nuclear fuel cycle -- the production, handling, and use of nuclear fuel and the safe disposal of waste produced by the generation of nuclear energy -- or on the production of fusion energy. Some specialize in the development of nuclear power sources for spacecraft; others find industrial and medical uses for radioactive materials, such as equipment to diagnose and treat medical problems.



Note: Some resources in this section are provided by the American Nuclear Society, and the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
 


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